Grenada

Maintenance Technology is a technical instructional program that prepares individuals to work in a variety of roles including, but not limited to, industrial maintenance and engineering support positions. Students receive instruction in maintaining and troubleshooting electrical, automation, and mechanical systems; instruction in continuous improvement methods including quality systems, facility layout, workstation design, and lean manufacturing techniques; and instruction in the operation of basic machine tool equipment, computer numerical controlled equipment, welding equipment, and metal fabrication. This program is offered in a completely hybrid format as well as a face-to-face classroom format.

Curriculum

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Maintenance Technology

I liked learning about the maintenance world. The classes are great as well as the teachers who teach them. The Grenada Campus is full of nice people, and it is small and convenient.

Austin Brower, Grenada Campus

Course Descriptions

ENT 1313 - Principles of CAD.
This course is designed to teach students the basic operating system and drafting skills. Two hours lecture. Two hours lab. Three hours credit.

IMM 1143 - Commercial/Industrial Wiring.
Instruction and practice in the installation of commercial and industrial electrical services including the types of conduit and other raceways, NEC code requirements, and three-phase distribution networks. Two lectures. Two hours laboratory. Three hours credit.

IMM 1313 - Principles of Hydraulics & Pneumatics.
Instruction in basic principles of hydraulics and pneumatics, and the inspection, maintenance, and repair of hydraulic and pneumatic systems. One lecture. Four hours laboratory. Three hours credit.

IMM 1814 - Industrial Electricity/Industrial Maintenance Mechanics.
Instruction in terminology and basic principles of electricity, use of test equipment, safety practices for working around and with electricity, and basic electrical procedures. Two lectures. Four hours laboratory. Four hours credit.

IMM 1823 - Advanced Electricity/Industrial Maintenance Mechanics (Prerequisite: IMM 1813).
Advanced skills and knowledge associated with electrical systems in an industrial setting. Content includes instruction in the National Electrical Code, electrical circuits, motors, and estimating expenses for a given project. Six hours laboratory. Three hours credit.

IMM 1933 - Manufacturing Skills.
This course is designed to provide the student with the basic skills needed to be successful in a high-performance manufacturing environment. The course covers the following topics critical to employment; basic computer literacy, safety and CPR, blueprint reading, precision measurement, and an introduction to manufacturing improvement methods such as Lean Manufacturing, Quick Changeover, 5S, teamwork and problem solving. Three lectures. Three hours credit.

MST 1114 - Power Machinery I
A course in the operation of power machinery. Includes instruction and practice in the safe operation of lathes, drill presses, and vertical mills. Two lectures. Four hours laboratory. Four hours credit.

MST 1313 - Machine Tool Mathematics
An applied mathematics course designed for machinists. Includes instruction and practice in algebraic and trigonometric operations essential for successful machining. Two lectures. Two hours laboratory. Three hours credit.

MST 1413 - Blueprint Reading
A course in blueprint reading designed for machinists. Includes instruction and practice in reading industrial blueprints. Two lectures. Two hours laboratory. Three hours credit.
 
MST 1423 - Advanced Blueprint Reading (Prerequisite: MST 1413)
A continuation of Blueprint Reading with emphasis on advanced feature of technical prints. Includes instruction on the identification of various projections and views and on different assembly components. Two lectures. Two hours laboratory. Three hours credit.

ROT 2413 - Automated Manufacturing Controls.
This course is designed to teach the students the integrated control systems found in automated systems. Emphasis will be placed on encoders, optical devices, servo motors, stepper motors, computerized numerical control (CNC), vision and sensing systems, lasers, programmatic controllers, motor speed controls, and other similar devices. Two lectures. Two hours laboratory. Three hours credit.